The Inn on The Green

Although now a pub, The Inn on the Green was once part of a farm and maltings complex that fronted the Green. After 1948 it was sold and was converted to the Dice (Dyce) House Country Club. The licence was changed in the 1970s and since then it has been a public house and restaurant under a variety of ownership and names.

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Before the 1918 Estate Sale

 

In 1863 this was part of the farm/maltings complex with cottages bought by James Thorpe from Edward Chivers Bower of Tickhill Castle York for £11,500. In the 1918 Estate Sale it became:

  • Lot 6 Farm (the core of Manor Dairy Farm, the farmhouse of which eventually became the Inn on the Green pub)
  • Lot 43 (the Laurels)
  • Lot 58 (the cottage that was to become Manor Dairy Farmhouse)
  • Lots 40 - 41 (cottages around the Green, now demolished).

 

 

 

In 1863 The complex on the Green consisted of:

  • (1) messuage (house) with gig house, yard, garden, orchard, maltkiln and offices, stables, granaries and warehouse
  • (1a - The Laurels) a second house had a back kitchen, and garden in the SE corner
  • (1b - now part of Cherry Tree Cottage) an attached brick built and tiled cottage, lying beyond the Maltings.
In 1861 the Farmer was John Fryer. Census reveals the following 9 people living in the farm, with 6 more living in the Laurels and with John Birkett (family of 4) living the cottage beyond the Maltings(now part of Cherry Tree Cottage).

 

 

54

John Fryer

Head

un. 38

Farmer 352a

6 labs, 3 boys

Flintham Notts

Francis Fryer

Father

m. 78

Retired farmer

Flintham Notts

Milicent Fryer

Mother

m. 60

Retired farmer?s wife

Sutton in Ashfield Notts

Ann Fryer

Sister

Un. 23

Coddington

Mary A Carr

servant

Un. 20

House servant

Balderton Notts

Emma Gray

servant

un. 16

Dairy maid

Car Colston Notts

John Staniland

Servant

un. 17

Carter

Coddington

Askew Blackbourn

Servant

un. 16

Carter

Branston Lincs

William Taylor

Servant

un. 13

Carter

Collingham Notts

 

By 1871 the Weightmans were the farmers in the main house, with a household of 17 on census night, The Stanfields had moved into the Laurels, and the Birkets and son William were still in the cottage.

 

 

48

Agur Weightman

Head

m. 52

Farmer of 192a 3 labourers + 1 boy

Auborn Lincs

May Weightman

Wife

m. 47

Kibworth Leics

Charles B Weightman

Son

Un. 21

Farmer's son

Bassingham Lincs

Mary L Weightman

Dau.

Un. 20

Farmer's dau

Bassingham Lincs

Elizabeth Weightman

Dau.

Un. 16

scholar

Bassingham Lincs

Emily Weightman

Dau.

14

scholar

Bassingham Lincs

Margaret Weightman

Dau.

11

scholar

Bassingham Lincs

Kate C? Weightman

Dau.

9

scholar

Bassingham Lincs

Frederick H Weightman

son

8

scholar

Bassingham Lincs

Ag?? T Weightman

son

6

scholar

Coddington

Arthur P Weightman

son

4

scholar

Coddington

Mary Bryant

Mother in law

W 73

Kibworth Leics

Thomas B Weightman

Nephew

Un. 27

miller

Bassingham Lincs

Sarah Bailey

serv

Un. 25

Gen servant

Bennington Lincs

Christopher Cook

serv

Un. 21

Farm ?

Besthorpe Notts

Jarvey Bennett

serv

Un. 19

Farm ?

Bennington Lincs

John  Baguley

serv

Un. 16

Farm ?

Doddington Lincs

 

In 1881 George Ross was the farmer in the main house. The Stanfields occupied the Laurels and John Birkett the cottage.

The Ross household was:

George Ross

36

head

Farmer 209a employing 5 men 2 boys

Scopwick Lincoln

Sophia Ross

39

wife

Harrowby, Lincoln

Sophia A Ross

7

dau

scholar

Coddington

Nellie Ross

5

dau

scholar

Coddington

George A Ross

3

son

Coddington

Emma Allen

41

Sister in law

Harrowby, Lincoln

Sarah A Worth

13

servant

Farm domestic servant

Beckingham, Lincs

Thomas Smith

14

servant

Farm servant indoor

 

The 1918 Estate Sale

 

By 1918 the Estate Sale Catalogue reveals that the Ross's father and son are running both this farm and the adjacent compact farm, Home Farm. They bought Home Farm, some land and the Lot 36 cottage in the sale whilst Lot 6 went to a newcomer to the village, James Hollingworth.

  • Lot 5 - A most Desirable Compact Farm: Home Farm of 136a 0r 32p (West of Drove Lane) Tenants associated with it Mr G and Mr GA Ross - sold to Mr GA Ross, Coddington for £6,100.
  • Lot 6 - A compact Farm of 151a 1r 20p (Village Farm, the nucleus of Manor Dairy Farm). Tenants associated with it Mr G and Mr GA Ross - sold to Mr (J) Hollingworth for £3,000.

 

 

In the Estate Sale Catalogue the house in lot 6 was described as:'brick built and tiled and contains entrance hall, dining room, drawing room, 6 bedrooms on the first floor, 3 upper bedrooms, good kitchen, scullery, brewhouse, dairy, pantry and cellar'.

 

The farm buildings consisted of 2-bay trap shed, calf place and piggeries, malt kiln now used as a barn, with loft over, loose box and stall, mixing house and calf house loft running over these and the archway leading from the street. There was a walled in kitchen garden and lawn.

 

The Mr GA Ross was the tenant of the Cottage, which contained living room, kitchen, 2 bedrooms wash house and coal house. The farm also kept the stackyard and buildings on the corner of the Green and Drove Lane. Miss Stanfield bought her home,The Laurels, in a separate Lot.

 

 

1918 To 1948

 

Lot 6 became Manor Dairy Farm. James Hollingworth and later his son Fred built up a quality herd of Friesian dairy cows and a dairy in Albert St. Newark. The malt kiln may have been used for malting again in the 1920s. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The farmhouse becomes an exclusive club

 

In 1948 the Hollingworths kept Maltings Cottage but sold the original farmhouse. They moved across the road to a cottage next to their stockyard which eventually became the current house, Manor Dairy Farmhouse. They continued dairy farming until 1984.

 

 

Meanwhile WAC Anderson turned the old farmhouse into an exclusive social club for members only - 'The Dice House Country Club'. Bernard Mastin was the Chairman of the Club Committee overseeing the conversion from farmhouse to club. In the 1950's Squadron Leader 'Lofty' Allen bought it and Tommy Trinder appeared there.

 

 

The licence was changed from club to public house. In the 1970s it was kept by an Irish couple John and Ann Crosbie. They built up the business and turned it into a steakhouse called the Stableford (or Stapleford) Inn. It was bought by Robbie Lester George and became the Rob Roy Steakhouse, 'The Inn on the Green' (as it was in 1987).

 

Since then the pub and restaurant has changed hands and names several times, including one spell as 'The Hungry Horse'.